Saint Tysilio's Church Sellack

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Features of Particular Interest

The Organ

An organ was originally given to the church in 1599 by Sir William Mather and it cost £230.

The present instrument dates from around the 1890s. It consists of a single manual and pedals with eight stops and is generally considered an excellent example of its type with particularly fine tonal quality.

The organ originally stood at ground level but was repositioned to the minstrels' gallery following a major overhaul about 70 years ago. In 1992 it had a further overhaul keeping it in line with the original specification just replacing 4’ harmonic flute with a 15th. Read more...

The East Window


The east window is quite special, containing glass from the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries. It is thought that it was put together by Rowland (Richard?) Scudamore in 1630. The date and the initials can be seen in the window.

The figures are those of St. Mary and the Child, The Magi, St. Joseph, St. Mary Magdalene and also a stable with an ox and ass. In the south corner is the figure of St. Catherine; of a later date than the rest. Part of the wheel connecting her with her martyrdom is to be seen. This window, with all its mixture of periods, was copied to form the east window in Foy Church.

A civil war story is told about the window. A party of parliamentary soldiers left Ross for the secluded and beautiful village of Sellack, with the intention of destroying the cross and chancel window – which then, as now, was filled with stained glass. The vicar, suspecting their designs, received them so hospitably that they wouldn’t carry out their sacrilegious project. Except one man! He had made a vow to destroy Popery but compounded his conscience by merely applying his piece to the lower part of the window and discharging a bullet through it. The hole was filled with plain glass and a few bits still remain near the bottom of the window.

The windows of the Caradoc Chapel also contain some 14th-century glass as does the window by the pulpit.

The Chancel Panelling

This and the communion rail, the pulpit and the gallery are all 17th-century woodwork.  The front panelling of the gallery is more modern.